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Dracula and the Comic Connection

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The Comic Connection-Dracula and Bram Stoker Today

Page updated 1 November 2012

Dracula 1897 yellow cover

Dracula: That one was comics, again… but, oddly enough, not the Marvel comics.

In that same junior high library where I found Fantastic Voyage, there were also a number of “Classic Comics” paperback adaptations from Pendulum Press. One of them was Dracula.

Dracula-Comic-book-Bram-Stoker
Dracula-Comic-book-Bram-Stoker

For a 'classic comics' version, this was pretty damn good.

This was a relatively faithful adaptation of the Stoker novel, scripted by Naunerle Farr with some very nice art by Nestor Redondo.

Dracula-Comic-book-Bram-Stoker

It's a pity that the pages were printed at such a tiny size; the books weren't even as large as a standard comic.

There were no credits so it would be years before I put it together that this was the same guy that had been doing the art on some DC books I liked. But even for the sort of textbooky Classics Comics adaptation this was, I could see the story was hardcore.

Dracula-Comic-book-Bram-Stoker

For a seventh-grade schoolbook this is pretty rockin'.

Not too long after that, taking on chores like mowing lawns and such, I became a man of means, with my own income. It all pretty much went for books and comics, and one of the first books I bought was this oddity from Drake Publishing.

Illustrated-Dracula-Bram-Stoker

I really loved this. Unabridged text and packed with movie stills.

The Illustrated Dracula was exactly what it said it was. A big coffee-table edition of Stoker’s novel, unabridged, with illustrations (all Bela Lugosi stills from the Universal film version) on almost every page. And I sort of knew the story already from the comics version, so I got into it pretty easily.

Once I’d read the novel I was much more interested in the film versions of Dracula that the local station would sometimes run on its Saturday night “Sinister Cinema,” and I eventually found my way to the Marvel Comics Tomb of Dracula as well. But for me it was Pendulum Press and Nestor Redondo that got there first.

(Marvel did eventually reprint the Pendulum press version, actually, in their “Marvel Classics Comics” #9.)

Dracula-Classic-Comics-Bram-Stoker
Dracula-Classic-Comics-Bram-Stoker

The color was nice and anyway, it pleased me to see that Marvel had the good taste to reprint it.

*

 

These great illustrations and insight

come from the following entry posted at:

FRIDAY AT THE TIPPING POINT by Greg Hatcher,

Comics Should Be Good on the Comic Book Resources Website

Dracula-One-City-One-Book-Dublin
Dracula-1st-edition-1897-Constable
Dracula-One City-One Book, Dublin 2009

1983, Mick Austin cover art

Mick Stevens

New Yorker-Dracula
Dracula, Comic
Dracula-1897-yellow-cover-Constable
Dracula
Bram Stoker's Death Ship IDW

1960's Aurora Dracula model, from Golden Age Comic Book Stories Blog

Dracula
Bram Stoker's Death Ship IDW
Dracula figure